Now More Than Ever

Come for an afternoon of information and undersea wonders as marine biologists, elected officials and conservation advocates come together to discuss the protections that national marine sanctuary status have brought to treasures of marine habitat and wildlife elsewhere along the California coast, and how it can happen for SLO and Santa Barbara via designation of the Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary.* Continue reading

Advertisements

Nomination

Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary

Nominator Name(s) and Affiliation(s) Fred Collins, Northern Chumash Tribal Council

Nomination Point of Contact Fred Collins, Northern Chumash Tribal Council, 67 South St., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401  (805) 801-0347

Section II – Introduction

The waters of the proposed Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary (CHNMS) lie between the Channel Island National Marine Sanctuary and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The unique coastline and ocean waters are the most beautiful in the world to the First Peoples and the communities that live along this ecologically rich, biologically diverse healthy coastline, and to many that come from all over the world to visit our coast. Continue reading

Heritage

Through Time and Space… One Continuum

Since the beginning of time and space, the Chumash people have lived in this magical land that is called San Luis Obispo County. The Chumash are the First Peoples of this land and have thrived as a maritime culture along this coastline enjoying its magnificent beauty. The Chumash are still a vibrant community, practicing their heritage and culture today.

Welcome to the land of the Chumash.

slo-county-large.jpg

California Central Coast

Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary

 

Purpose and Area

Area in need of protectionThe proposed Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary is dedicated to the nurturing of relationships to Nature and the Ocean in the deepest ways possible. The Chumash understanding and culture-based respect for Nature comes from their long and profound relationships with coastal marine ecosystems.

The proposed Sanctuary embodies internationally and nationally significant oceanographic features, habitat and sacred Chumash onshore and submerged sites, some as far as13 miles offshore. Codependent onshore resources include the high coastal dunes, wetlands and Chumash Sacred sites continuously occupied for 9,000 or more years.

Continue reading